Sunday, November 14, 2010

The Domest Artist: Large Family Budgeting


One of the biggest responsibilities of the homemaker is learning how to make a dollar stretch for her household. There are many ways you can save when you have a large family and we can ALL be good home economists if we study and keep trying to apply what we learn. The trick is not to give up and to keep at it. We must think smarter about how we do things. A little here, a little there and it all adds up! Here are some great clips for inspiration:

(Remember to turn off the music in the sidebar before watching!)

America's Cheapest Family  Saves 50% on their food budget:



Clothes are also a big issue for large families. But what if we simplified?

Watch Money Saving Mom's minimalist approach to her wardrobe:



The Duggars teach us how to make homemade laundry soap and take us on a food shopping trip:



My friend, Lori, shares her decorating tips:


And for menu ideas and thrifty inspiration check out:


From the first video above, America's Cheapest Family, now have two books out, one that is a bestseller--



This thrifty set of 2 books are on SALE for 20% off, now only $24-- you save $6!
 
Now what are some ways you save money with a large family?


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7 comments:

  1. We are really trying hard to spend less on food, its hard with picky eaters, cant wait to see some comments with suggestions

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  2. I really do believe that the best ways a family can save money, whether there are few or many children, is to begin when those children are little....babies. Instituting a program of frugality while children are half-grown will seem abrupt, & even harsh. This is not, of course, to say that parents shouldn't follow a tighter financial course if they know they must. It's just that it's easier to begin early. There's definitely more time to practice that way!

    Food: children must learn that sometimes meals will include favorites, & sometimes not. Really, they won't die if they are told they must try a small piece of something that they're convinced they don't like. And if they don't eat it, well....I guess it's a long time til breakfast. Parental attitudes will go a long way toward affecting the way children perceive certain foods, whether positively or negatively. And to touch again on what I said about meals sometimes being one person's favorites & other times not: the cook must learn to be sharp, & take into account everyone's likes & dislikes. Yes, even her own & her husband's. Children gain a great feeling of importance hearing the words, "I know how much you like thus-and-so, & I thought of you while I was making it!" But conversely, nothing has spoiled the eating habits of so many as "kid-friendly" meals.

    Clothing: hand-me-downs will save the day. And the used markets(rummage sales, thrift shops, etc.) And clothes swaps. And sewing.

    Read Amy Dacyczyn's "Tightwad Gazette" for many, many good ideas on saving money. I'll bet that Economides family has much good information as well. People who live what they preach can usually be trusted to be on the right track!

    Brenda

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  3. I gave you a blog award-check it out here:

    http://happyhomemakerandmomma.blogspot.com/2010/11/we-have-csn-winner-wohoo-i-received.html

    Thank you for your site-it is an inspiration!!

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  4. We stay away from name brands. There are only a few things we've found that it is better in the long run to buy a name brand. Very few things. 99% of what we buy is off-brand or store brand. For food, we make a lot of what we eat from scratch. Even pizza. :) From the very start we trained our children to eat what was set before them. They have to try new foods at least once. I don't have any picky eaters. They are allowed a couple of dislikes, but they aren't allowed to complain if they accidentally get it on their plate (like if we're at someone else's house). We buy most of our clothes are thrift stores or yard sales and I also make the girls' dresses. We do hand-me-downs all the time. We also accept hand-me-downs. We hardly ever buy toys; those are picked up at thrift stores or yard sales, but mostly received as gifts. We only eat out on special occasions. For my husband and I to have a date night we take our children with us to save on a babysitter. We eat at a fast food place and just sit at a different table than the children. :) Talk about your chaperones! We have 9 of them. lol Well, that's all I can think of in the ways we save money.

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  5. wow what a great post! I love all teh video's

    Funny a week ago I posted about my minimalistic wardrobe, of 4 dresses! Yap 4 dress 2 sweater and that is it!

    Makes laundry was much easier :-)

    thanks for all the tips!

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  6. Thanks for all the tips & in the above comments too, though I'd probably save some money by not spending $24 on a book!
    Liz x
    WWW.trulygoodwoman.blogspot.com

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  7. Another good tip is to buy name brands from resale and thrift stores. If you can take very good care of them you can possibly resell them on Ebay when your kids grow out of them for more than you purchased them for. I have done this many times, and it always brings a smile to my face when I sell a $1 outfit for $10. :)

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